Notes and solutions to Kittel and Kroemer’s Thermal Physics and Manifolds in thermodynamics

20161109 update

I still find myself referring back to these notes on thermodynamics as I master Space Propulsion (with a focus on liquid-propellant rocket engines).

I’ve placed these notes (LaTeX file and pdf and images and all) in a permanent home on github:

The links below to my Google Drive and wordpress files (and the Patreon links, if you had been able to search for it, are especially old as I’m trying to remove my Patreon profile) are old and not updated.

Go here

Beginning in 2016, realizing that I needed an attitude and mind set of abundance, and not a mind set of scarcity, scarcity in finances and opportunities, I am keeping these notes available publicly on my github repository mathphysics (along with other notes on physics, math, and mathematical physics) for free. I’ve never received any money at all from my previous crowdfunding efforts whether on Indiegogo, tilt, Patreon, or here on PayPal. I’m not going to turn down a donation via PayPal.

But asking for your donation or money or funds is a mindset of scarcity and not a mindset of abundance and so I’ll keep putting out more academic physics stuff on thermodynamics (and math, physics, and mathematical physics in general) on my github.

Introduction

I found myself needing to remind myself of some things from thermodynamics, because I am trying to learn about rocket propulsion, and I fall back again on my notes and solutions pdf on Kittel and Kroemer’s Thermal Physics. Since I find myself continuously looking back on this pdf, I want to share it here now, as in the future, I’d update it with notes.

Kittel_Kroemer_Thermal_Physics pdf on wordpress.com

Notes and Solutions to Kittel and Kroemer’s Thermal Physics pdf in Google Drive

Notes and Solutions to Kittel and Kroemer’s Thermal Physics LaTeX .tex file in Google Drive

First figure to Kittel_Kroemer_Thermal_Physics.tex

second figure to Kittel_Kroemer_Thermal_Physics.tex

Solutions are (almost) complete, for first 9 or so chapters; I’ll try to add notes in subsections before the solutions in each chapter.

You guys are all responsible adults to use the solutions to learn and not to cheat on your homework or exam with the respective conduct guidelines. And give credit where credit is due when quoting or reusing solution write-ups. On the other hand, in terms of collaboration, Sebastian Thrun of Udacity and Google X, and with what he says about collaboration, profoundly impacts and influences me. He says,

Collaboration, in the academic trade, has a word; it’s called cheating. But employers really value the ability to collaborate…perhaps the most important factor in our placement [of people in jobs] is how well they collaborate. -Sebastian Thrun

cf. Online Learning: The Challenge Sebastian Thrun, about minute 42

And on the point of plagiarism, or not giving credit where credit’s due, my point is that I want to put things out in the spirit of Open-Source Software (OSS) because sometimes I could forget to reference or credit a reference in some honest mental lapse, and others online could correct for that and add the reference. Or point out what’s a complete copy and point to the true originator. Isn’t that what the promise of “crowd wisdom”, “crowd sourcing” is all about?

Copying and representing something is fine, as long as credit is given where credit is due. For instance, many years ago, I find myself as an physics undergraduate taking Ph125, Advanced Quantum Mechanics, and the professor gave us pdf lecture notes that for the first two months was original, brilliant, and had new insights. But after getting through the linear algebra/mathy part of Quantum Mechanics, and getting into spherical harmonics for solving 3-d potential well systems, the notes he started handing to us were bits and pieces of Cohen-Tannoudji, et. al.’s Quantum Mechanics two volume phonebook (which is what he called it; we were supposed to use Merzbacher’s Quantum Mechanics as the recommended text), but rearranged in order and in need. By the middle of the second semester of Ph125, the notes were complete lifts, word for word, of whole chapters out of Cohen-Tannoudji. Now handing out entire, verbatim, copies of chapters out of Cohen-Tannoudji is fine, we all live busy lives, and we can’t rewrite or reinvent the wheel in terms of writing about Quantum Mechanics, and sometimes, there is a best and clear explanation that comes out of, shines above other ways to explain something. But don’t pull the wool over the eyes of students by passing these notes as class notes with no reference! A more transparent thing to do is to say, “hey, the notes I’m handing out are copied entirely from verbatim of Cohen-Tannoudji and in class I’m going to do the same; but what I’ll do is point out exactly what you need to read and maybe instead of me lecturing to you and reciting Cohen-Tannoudji, then in class, we’ll work together on more problems so you guys will get more and more practice. Or I’ll hold your hand through the reading if that helps in the learning process.”

Manifolds in thermodynamics

Update 20150912: I added some notes along this avenue in the section “Heat and Work” of the solutions.

In the pdf, at the bottom, I give some references that help in this avenue. My inquiry is along this stackexchange post:
stackexchange: Introduction to differential forms in thermodynamics

Again, power of crowdsourcing, there are a number of very interesting links to references, in particular Bernard Schutz’s Geometric Methods in Mathematical Physics. I don’t feel super strong with Frobenius’ Theorem (still), but what I’d like to do is get good with Frobenius’ Theorem and see how it applies to thermodynamics. I’d also want to see what new calculations could be made from a manifold point of view in thermodynamics than just reinventing the wheel.

Learning Thermodynamics (in 10 days)

Many years ago (let’s just say, less than 5 years ago), I find myself having to review Thermodynamics for the GRE Subject Physics test, which I had been obsessed about nailing a +900 score (I ended up with 890 or so). Very obsessed (and the GRE exams are themselves expensive! In retrospect, I would’ve spent that money on traveling or buying my mom and dad an enjoyable meal; there are way more valuable things of value than only a life of academic excellence). Anyways, I forgot almost everything I learned in Ph12c, Thermodynamics, so I sat down for 10 days straight, reading, writing notes, working through, and working out almost all the problems in the first 9 chapters of Kittel and Kroemer’s Thermal Physics. After the 10 days, I felt super-clear about thermodynamics, and really wished I was this super-clear when I took Ph12c!

I highly recommend Kittel and Kroemer’s book for thermodynamics. I would caveat that although the math is “basic” (at most multi-linear calculus?), you should be able to do math fast and clearly in your head. It helps you get past the tedium and to the heart of the concept.

Donate!

Donate Button with Credit Cards If you like my notes and github repositories, please consider donating to me on PayPal (it’s easy! All you need is an email and to press the PayPal donate button) or at my ernestyalumni.tilt.com crowdfunding campaign. I am committed and on principle, I will keep everything I make and put out open-sourced, open and publicly available to anyone, anywhere, anytime; your help, even as little as $5, would help me create even more value (see the Tilt campaign for my mission and plans and projects to execute).



Donate Button with Credit Cards If you like my notes and github repositories, please consider donating on PayPal (it’s easy! All you need is an email and to press the PayPal donate button) or at my ernestyalumni.tilt.com crowdfunding campaign. I am committed and on principle, I will keep everything I make and put out open-sourced, open and publicly available to anyone, anywhere, anytime; your help, even as little as $5, would help me create even more value (see the Tilt campaign for my mission and plans and projects to execute).


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